On This Day in Country Music

  • On this day December 15, 1944

    Hank Williams married Audrey Sheppard, their son, Randall Hank Williams, who would achieve fame in his own right as Hank Williams, Jr., was born on May 26, 1949. The marriage ended in divorce on May 29, 1952.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 14, 1974

    Billy Swan scored his only #1 country single with “I Can Help”. The song was also a hit in the UK and Australia as well as Norway where it charted for 37 weeks on the Norwegian charts, making it the 4th best-performing single of all time in that country.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 13, 1989

    Born on this day in Reading, Pennsylvania, was Taylor Alison Swift, singer, songwriter, musicican, named by as most financially successful music artist of 2011, with net earnings of more than $35 million. Her debut single Tim McGraw released in June 2006, peaked at #6 on the US Country chart. Swift moved to Nashville, Tennessee at the age of fourteen to pursue a career in country music and became the youngest songwriter ever hired by the Sony/ATV Music publishing house.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 12, 1988

    Waylon Jennings underwent triple bypass surgery at Nashville’s Baptist Hospital. The singer later said he had quit smoking five or six packs a day after being a smoker for 40 years.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 12, 1966

    Merle Haggard released the single “The Fugitive” (later titled “I’m a Lonesome Fugitive” on the album), which became Haggard’s first #1 hit on the country chart. Although not written by Haggard, the song became one of the most closely associated with the early part of his career, as it drew upon his then still-relatively recent prison term for burglary.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 11, 1944

    Born on this day in Atlanta, Georgia, was Brenda Lee. At 4 ft. 9 inches tall (approximately 145 cm), she received the nickname ‘Little Miss Dynamite’ in 1957 after recording the song “Dynamite”; and was one of the earliest pop stars to have a major contemporary international following. In 1997, she was inducted into the
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 10, 1996

    Faron Young, American singer and songwriter from the early 1950s into the mid-1980s shot himself after apparently being depressed that the music industry had turned its back on him. He died in Nashville the following day. His hits included “If You Ain’t Lovin’ (You Ain’t Livin’)” and “Live Fast, Love Hard, Die Young.” His ashes were spread by his family over Old Hickory Lake outside Nashville at Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash’s home while the Cashes were away.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 09, 1995

    Alan Jackson was at #1 on the Country charts with his version of “Tall, Tall Trees”. Written by George Jones and Roger Miller, both singers recorded their own versions: Jones on his 1958 album and Miller on his 1970 cover album
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 09, 1968

    During recording sessions at Capitol Recording Studios in Los Angeles, Merle Haggard recorded “Hungry Eyes” which was featured on his 1969 album and when released as a single became a Country #1 and one of the most famous of his career.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 09, 2005

    The cowboy movie opened in theaters across the US. The soundtrack featured Roger Miller’s “King Of The Road,” Tammy Wynette’s “D-I-V-O-R-C-E” and Merle Haggard’s “I’m Always On A Mountain When I Fall”, as well as tracks by Emmylou Harris, Willie Nelson, Steve Earle and Linda Ronstadt.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 07, 1983

    Kenny Rogers & Dolly Parton were awarded a platinum single for “Islands In The Stream”. Written by the Bee Gees it was the first single from Rogers’ album and the second pop #1 for both Rogers and Parton (Rogers having been there with 1980’s “Lady” and Parton with 1981’s “9 to 5”).
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 06, 1976

    Willie Nelson was at #1 with The gospel album was recorded in 1973, but Nelson’s label Atlantic Records refused to release the record at the time. After Nelson signed a contract with Columbia Records, that gave him total creative control, the album was released in Sept 1976.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 06, 2013

    Chris Ferrell, the Nashville bar owner who shot and killed country singer Wayne Mills on Nov 23, turned himself in to police after learning that a grand jury had indicted him on second-degree murder charges. The shooting happened after two men, who who were reported to be friends, began arguing, reportedly because Mills was smoking a cigarette in a non-smoking area of the Pit and Barrel bar. No one witnessed the shooting itself, but several people outside heard the arguing and the gunshot. An autopsy revealed Mills was shot in the back of the head.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 05, 2000

    The soundtrack to was released, which went on to win a Award for Album of the Year in 2002. Among the artists featured: Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Dan Tyminski, The Whites, Gillian Welch, John Hartford, Ralph Stanley, The Cox Family and Norman Blake. The film written, directed and produced by the Coen Brothers starred George Clooney, John Turturro, Tim Blake Nelson, and John Goodman.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 04, 1944

    Born on this day, was Chris Hillman, one of the original members of The Byrds which in 1965 included Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, and Michael Clarke. Along with frequent collaborator Gram Parsons, Hillman was a key figure in the development of country rock, virtually defining the genre through his seminal work in The Byrds and The Flying Burrito Brothers and later became the leader of the country rock act Desert Rose Band who had the 1988 US Country #1 hit He’s Back and I’m Blue.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 03, 1989

    Connie B. Gay renowned as a “founding father” and “major force” in country music died aged 75. He is credited for coining the country music genre, which had previously been called hillbilly music. Gay was the founding president of the (CMA) and co-founder of the
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 02, 1964

    Buck Owens and his Buckaroos were at the top of the US Country charts with The album featured the chart topping single “My Heart Skips a Beat”, Owen’s third #1 hit.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 02, 1957

    “Jailhouse Rock” by Elvis Presley was at #1 on the magazine country charts. The Leiber and Stoller song which was from his third motion picture of the same name featured Mike Stoller as a piano player. Jailhouse Rock later became the first song to debut at #1 in Great Britain.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 02, 2016

    Mark Gray died aged 64. He was a member of Exile between 1979 and 1982 and Gray’s solo career includes three albums and eight Top 40 hits, of which the highest-peaking is the #6 Tammy Wynette duet “Sometimes When We Touch”. Gray also co-wrote “Take Me Down” and “The Closer You Get”, both of which became #1 hits for Alabama.
    Source: This Day in Country

  • On this day December 02, 1975

    Willie Nelson was at the top of the US Country charts with The album was inspired by the “Tale of the Red Headed Stranger”, a song that Nelson used to play as a DJ on his program in Fort Worth, Texas.
    Source: This Day in Country